A 3D Future

Arcomedlab’s solutions from Santiago to Miami

The case in question was that of a 12-year-old boy who had gone his whole life suffering from severe craniosynostosis, a birth defect where the skull does not form correctly. In this case, nearly half of his cranial structure remained undeveloped. Until last year, that is, when Arcomedlab manufactured the world’s largest cranial implant, which it used to cover almost the entirety of the skull of the young patient. Today, the boy thrives happily at school, enjoying the ordinary joys of childhood with newfound confidence. “Seeing the patients smiling again is the best pay,” says Ilan Rosenberg, CEO and Founder of Arcomedlab.

Ilan Rosenberg, CEO and Founder of Arcomedlab

Originally founded in Chile in 2018, Arcomedlab specializes in printing 3D custom-made synthetic bone implants for patients, using a high-performance polymer called PEEK. The implants are either sold to hospitals, private doctors, or to the patients directly. To date, the biotech company has successfully crafted more than 600 implants for patients in Mexico, Peru, Colombia, Costa Rica, Panama, and Chile. After being awarded “Best Chilean Startup” and “Best Biotech Latin American Company” by Ganesha Lab, a Chilean accelerator program for startups, Arcomedlab raised $1 million for their entry into the U.S. market through Miami. The start-up has raised over $2.5 million to date.

Arcomedlab originally considered following the big tech companies to conventional medical hubs like Boston or New York, but felt Miami was a better launching pad for Latin American companies. “A lot of patients suffer every day from different cranial [and] facial defects. And big pharma monopolizes the whole market. So, startups like Arcomedlab are game changers because we are offering better, faster, and cheaper solutions. This is the new era regarding medical devices,” says Rosenberg. Expanding into the U.S. market was not without its challenges, says the CEO. Navigating regulatory hurdles, establishing a foothold in a competitive landscape, and building trust among American consumers required determination and support from local investors and programs like Chile’s GoGlobal, which supports the internationalization of Chilean startups.

The implants are currently manufactured in Chile, where Rosenberg spends half the year. Now, with U.S. operations in place, the company is looking to manufacture implants in Miami for their North American clients. Until then, they are in the final stages of FDA approval to begin selling their cranial implants in the U.S., a process expected to finalize by next year. 

Arcomedlab’s 3D Custom-made synthetic bone implants

Miami’s allure for medical device manufacturers had been steadily growing, reflected in the Miami Customs District’s robust exports valued at $1.7 billion in 2023. Arcomedlab intends to ride the wave of this trend, making its latest devices here. Their most recent breakthrough? A patent for a custom-made cranial implant capable of storing and releasing different drugs, such as antibiotics, through a drip mechanism activated by gravity.

With a team of 12 full-time employees between Santiago and Miami, and a network of over 1,200 advisors worldwide, including surgeons and even NASA affiliates, Arcomedlab stands at the forefront of medical innovation. While current profitability was not disclosed, Rosenberg hinted at a promising year, edging closer to the million-dollar mark. Reflecting on their journey, Rosenberg says, “Before Arcomedlab was born, a lot of people in Latin America did not have any kind of fair access to these types of solutions. We changed that.”

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